What is my Hermès scarf worth, you wonder…

several scarves 1

You may have an HERMES scarf that has been forgotten in a drawer for years or you may have been given one as a gift that is just not “your thing”.  In any case, you have an Hermès scarf  and you wonder what is it worth?

Well, the simple answer is, whatever a buyer is willing and able to pay for your scarf at any given time.  Oh, you want a real value, I see…

So, here are some guidelines.  Some very obvious and some perhaps not so much.

Let’s have a look…

Equipements Civils et Militaires HERMES Silk Scarf Extremely RARE (2)

Hermes Silk Scarf Équipements Civils et Militaires 1948 VERY RARE, Hugo Grygkar 1948

The Équipements Civils et Militaires carre is from 1948.  That’s a 70 year old scarf!!!  There are not that many scarves around that are that old, let alone in excellent condition. Naturally the older, or more vintage your scarf is, typically the higher the value.  For our discussion, the term vintage describes scarves from when Hermes first introduced the carre (1937) to 1998 (20 years before present day).

In addition to its age, your scarf’s condition plays a big role in determining its value.  An unworn scarf with the care tag (if applicable) still attached in its original box or tote will for obvious reasons fetch much more than one with color runs, a hole and several pulled threads – common sense.

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Cosmos was designed by none other than Philippe Ledoux, who has created so many beautiful carrés for the Maison Hermes. First issued in 1964.  Here an original issue

Condition and age are logical, but what about other factors, perhaps less obvious ones, that may also influence a scarf’s desirability and ultimately its value.

A certain colorway may be more rare or more sought after.  The year of issue can also play a big role.  Lets use one of my favorites, The Le Bois de Boulogne designed by Hugo Grygkar in 1957, as an example.

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Le Bois de Boulogne designed by Hugo Grygkar in 1957

The same design was re-issued in the early 1980s in darker colors without the black background behind the swans resulting in a less dynamic scarf.

Le Bois de Boulogne HERMES VTG Hugo Grygkar

Le Bois de Boulogne reissued in the early 1980s without the black

In this example, an original issue Bois de Bologne in inferior condition may be priced/valued equally or even higher than a reissue in better condition, simply because of its esthetic appearance (better colorway and black behind swans).

Another factor that may affect value is location – geography.   Some scarves are more sought after in different parts of the world than others.

Faune et Flore du Texas by Kermit Oliver for HERMES

Faune et Flore du Texas by Kermit Oliver for HERMES (1992)

Kermit Oliver’s scarves depicting the American West are very popular in the US. His Texas Wildlife, for example has only recently gained the same momentum in Europe as it has enjoyed here in the US.

Timing is another factor than can influence perhaps not the value per se, but what someone might be willing to pay for your Texas Wildlife.  Leading up to Thanksgiving this design attracts a lot of potential buyers.  More buyers = higher demand = higher price tag.  This is true for other seasonal scarves, such as the Noel au 24 Faubourg, Joies d’Hiver, Neige d’Antan and Plumes et Grelots for example.

Noel au 24 Faubourg HERMES Carre

Noel au 24 Faubourg HERMES Carre, Dimitri Rybaltchenko, 2004

It must be mentioned, that there are certain scarves that are simply more “coveted” than their sisters and cousins.  Many times you will hear the word Grail to describe a scarf, such as the Hommage a l’Explorateur Sir Ernest Shackleton for example, designed by Zoe Pauwels and issued in 2005.

Hommage a l’Explorateur Sir Ernest Shackleton HERMES Grail Silk Scarf_-4

Very difficult to find, the “Shackleton” is definitely a modern Grail carre.  Although there is a consensus on a number of scarves that are in the Grail category, like the Shackleton for example, this Grail list can, however, be subjective.  What one collector may consider a Grail, another may not.  I personally try to be very careful not to overuse this label.  This includes describing a scarf “rare” or “very rare” can be somewhat subjective as well and again, I try to use them cautiously in my descriptions.

For me the Les Toits de Paris , La Comédie Italienne and Le Pont Neuf a Paris are definitely on my personal Grail list 🙂

What scarves are on your GRAIL list, I wonder?

This post would not be complete, if I did not mention the role the artist/designer can have on the value or popularity of a scarf.  Annie Faivre for example has a very large and loyal following around the globe.  Kermit Oliver whose scarves celebrate the American West, are not necessarily all considered rare, but are quite popular and in demand.

Another highly sought after artist is Xavier de Poret, whose scarves are considered very rare.  Famous for his pencil drawings, 5 of his carres (Les Levriers or Greyhounds and Mesanges to name just two), out of a group of nearly 30, are widely considered as the “rarest” of Hermes scarves.

Les Poulains HERMES Silk Scarf Xavier de Poret RARE

Les Poulains HERMES Silk Scarf Xavier de Poret RARE – GRAIL

I should also mention the Jacquards, which Hermes stopped producing in 2001 due to high production costs and only last year, 2017, began to issue jacquards in limited quantities, now called Tattoos.  A separate post on that coming soon.

A jacquard scarf will typically either sell faster or for more than its twill cousin or possibly both. But just like the twills, the Jacquards as a group range in value based on the same criteria already mentioned.

Some top sellers in this category are Napoleon and La Cle de Champs and lets not forget the seasonal favorites (Joies d’Hiver, Neige d’Antan and Plumes et Grelots).

Plumes Et Grelots HERMES VTG Silk Jacquard Scarf-22

Last but not least, HERMES periodically issues scarves as a Special Issue (slight variation on an existing design) or a Limited Issue (limited quantities produced), both of course can heavily influence the desirability, availability and ultimately the value of that particular scarf.

In closing, it is important to keep in mind that any given value will fluctuate over time.  Remember when way back in the 80s a brand new carre was somewhere around $140? Today the retail price for a 90cm twill carre is $395 US.

To find out what your scarf is worth or to authenticate a scarf, please email me at contact@carredeparis.com, select and purchase service(s) below. Service fee is per item.  Opinion will be rendered via email from time payment and last photo(s) have been received.

Carre de Paris - Home of Authentic Vintage and Pre-Owned Hermes scarves

Hermes Carre Authentication or Valuation Service

1 Hermes Scarf Turnaround Time 2 to 3 Business Days

$59.00

Carre de Paris - Home of Authentic Vintage and Pre-Owned Hermes scarves

Hermes Carre Authentication or Valuation Service

1 Hermes Scarf Turnaround Time 1 to 2 Days

$45.00

Carre de Paris - Home of Authentic Vintage and Pre-Owned Hermes scarves

Hermes Carre Authentication or Valuation Service

1 Hermes Scarf 24 Hour Turnaround Time (excludes holidays)

$99.00

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hermes Scarf Republique Francaise Liberte Egalite Fraternite – 1789

On my last visit to Paris, I could not help but be reminded of my favorite, subject, the Hermès scarf, wherever I went.

I saw inspiration, just like the artists themselves must have, around every corner in this enchanted city.  My favorite and very first scarf, Le Bois de Boulogne, is named after the biggest park, the Bois de Boulogne (I just learned thanks to WIKI, the second largest park), which is 2 and a half times the size of New York’s Central Park.

Another gorgeous vintage Hermès scarf is the Quai aux Fleur, which I had already written about during my stay in Paris.

Today I would like to focus on the Republique Française Liberté Égalité Fraternité – 1789, which was designed for the 200 year anniversary of the French republic.  In his design, Joachim Metz, celebrates France becoming a Republic and perhaps it was not Paris that was his inspiration, however, I found many references here.

The French revolution, which began in 1789, paved the way for France to become a republic in 1792 and Liberté, Egalité, Fraternité French for “Freedom, Equality, Brotherhood”, became the national motto. I, of course, must also mention Marianne, whom Metz so beautifully portrayed on this scarf. Marienne is France’s national emblem.  She represents liberty and is an icon for freedom and democracy.

I found Marianne in many places in Paris.  On government buildings, statues and many other landmarks.  Marianne is one of the most prominent symbols of the French Republic, and is officially used on most government documents.

Marianne is a significant French republican symbol.  She is Republique Française, she is Liberté, Égalité, Fraternité.

This dramatic scarf was first issued in 1989 at the 200 year anniversary of France as a republic and to my knowledge, it has never been re-issued.

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Republique Francaise Liberte Egalite Fraternite – 1789 Hermes Silk Scarf 
Designed by Joachim Metz in 1989  

Les Tuileries by Joachim Metz for the Maison Hermes

Here is one of my all time favorite Hermes scarves, Les Tuileries by Joachim Metz, named after the famous Parisian Gardens leading up to the Louvre.

Last time I was in Paris, a couple of summers ago, I fell in love not just with Paris all over again, but with this stunning part of heaven.  No wonder Mr. Metz used the elaborate entry to the gardens as inspiration for his stunning scarf.

Now available at Carredeparis.com

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Les Tuileries HERMES Scarf

Les Tuileries HERMES Scarf

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Les Tuileries HERMES Scarf

Stunning Hermes scarves coming soon…

Proud to be adding L’Arbre de Soie, L’Intrus and Les Ballet Russes in the next couple of days…

More gorgeous scarves coming up…

Check our store as these gorgeous HERMES scarves will be coming soon…

FEATURED Authentic Vintage Hermes Silk Scarf Plaza de Toros with Hermes Box

Authentic Vintage Hermès Silk Scarf Plaza de Toros was designed by Hubert de Watrigant in first issued in 1993.  Monsieur de Watrigant has brought us treasures such as the Carnaval de VeniseLes Chevaux Qataris and Ombrelles et Parapluies.
This highly sought after carré features colorful Spanish bull fighters.  Here in a striking colorway of yellow and orange contrasted by a kelly green

– in excellent vintage condition
– vibrant colors with great color saturation
– vintage soft silk
– copyright
– care tag
– signed
– hand rolled hem
– tiny what might be a snag
– made in France
– 100 % pure silk
– approx. dimensions: 36 x 36 inches and 90 x 90 cm
– guaranteed authentic
– Hermes scarf box may show signs of use
– layaway plans tailored to Your specific needs
– subject to prior sale

And one more coming soon…

La Ronde des Jockeys (re-issue) will be joining our stable of fine vintage equestrian scarves.  This re-issue sports the modern copyright as well as a newer care tag

This gorgeous carre was designed by Francoise de la Perriere and first issued in 1969 (please note copyright) and was called Ronde des Jockeys – Ascot 1831 (below)

Several Hermes Vintage Classics…

coming soon…

FEATURED Authentic Vintage Hermes Silk Scarf Ecuries Hugo Grygkar Re-issue with Hermes Box

Authentic Vintage Hermès Silk Scarf Écuries was designed by Hugo Grygkar in 1947 and re-issued in 1993.  Very rare and highly sought after, here a re-issue in excellent condition.   Gorgeous blues, grays accented by bold red create an elegant composition and a timeless carré.

So grab your riding jacket, boots, and of course your carré and lets go for a ride…

– in excellent vintage condition
– vibrant colors with great color saturation
– vintage soft silk
– copyright
– care tag
– hand rolled hem
– tiny speck and remains of a fold line (photos 3 and 4)
– made in France
– 100 % pure silk
– approx. dimensions: 36 x 36 inches and 90 x 90 cm
– guaranteed authentic
– Hermes scarf box may show signs of use
– layaway plans tailored to Your specific needs
– subject to prior sale

The Musée carré

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The Musée carré was designed by none other than Philippe Ledoux, who brought us so many beautiful vintage Hermès scarves.

This scarf was first issued in 1962 and pays homage to Émile Hermès‘ vast collection of art and artifacts.  The now Émile Hermès Museum, situated above the Hermès flagship store on 24 Rue du Faubourg Saint-Honoré is unfortunately not open to the public.

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Hermès 24 Rue du Faubourg Saint-Honoré, Paris, 2013

Émile Hermès’ former offices form an impressive series of wood-paneled rooms and house his vast collection, which might at first glance seem disorganized in the sense that is so varied and ranges from lapelles to paintings, model boats and coaches, walking sticks, etchings and drawings to stirrups, spurs, elaborate bits and coin purses.

A connoisseur of beauty and esthetics, Émile surrounded himself with these very objects, which inspired not just him but the two early Hermès artists, Hugo Grygkar and Philippe Ledoux.  It was perhaps here, sitting at his desk, that Émile first conceived the idea to transform the scarf, which until then a men’s accessory, into “a must have” for every woman.  The carré as we know it, was born and Hugo and Philippe drew inspiration from Émile’s vast collection and under his careful watchful eye, carrés such as the Keys, Ludovicus Magnus and Ex Libris were born.

The Musée also reflects Ledoux’s love of the Musée National de la Marine, which he frequented often and which also inspired many of his carrés.

The Musée is a wonderful collage of all things Hermès and Ledoux.  A beautiful scarf with nautical and equestrian items and accessories making it possibly the first themed where the surf meets the turf so to speak carré (sorry Del Mar :-))