L’Arriere-Main Hermes carre

L’Arriere-Main Hermès carré by Philippe Ledoux 1969 – RARE – Personal Collection

The lovely L’Arriere-Main Philippe Ledoux carré draws its inspiration from a painting by Théodore Géricault entitled Les Croupes, (The Hindquarters/Buttocks).

Théodore Géricault was a French Romantic Painter (1791-1824) from Rouen, France. His oil painting entitled Les Croupes, (The Hindquarters/Buttocks) provided the Inspiration for the 1969 Hermès carré, L’Arriere-Main by Philippe Ledoux

Most likely the studies for this painting found their inspiration at the Royal Stable, the Grande Écurie of Versailles, an impressive structure that could accommodate up to six hundred horses. Constructed during the 17th century under the watchful eye of Jules Hardouin-Mansart, the Royal Stables have been home to the Equestrian Arts Academy (Académie du spectacle équestre) since 2003.

The Great Stables or Royal Stable, the Grande Écurie, at the Palace of Versailles
Les Croupes – close up

Les Croupes, which portrays twenty-four horses from behind is rather an unusual compositions as it features the hindquarters and not the heads of twenty-four horses in three neat rows. Surprisingly there is one defiant horse that stands out as it is turned around facing us, the audience. I cannot help but attribute lightness and humor to this rather unusual arrangement and composition.

Perhaps charmed by this as well was what inspired Philippe Ledoux to reproduce the Les Coupes as a drawing for his 1969, L’Arriere-Main, now highly sought-after design.

L’ARRIERE-MAIN HERMÈS SILK SCARF VINTAGE LEDOUX 1969 – AVAILABLE

Surprisingly Monsieur Ledoux omits the rebellious horse in his drawing but includes the same checkered blankets that are very often found in Géricault’s other paintings. Perhaps it will remain a mystery why Ledoux left the defiant horse out, but included the horse blankets, which undoubtedly link his design to the French master’s. With this the L’Arriere-Main Hermès carré features three rows but only twenty-three hindquarters and not the twenty-four from its original Inspiration.

L’ARRIERE-MAIN HERMES SCARF BY PHILIPPE LEDOUX 90 CM SILK TWILL 1969 – RARE – AVAILABLE

LE TIMBALIER HERMES SCARF BY MARIE-FRANCOISE HERON

We have all seen the timpanist, some of use “love” this design, some of us are indifferent and the rest … well …

I used to belong to the “rest … well” group. Even as a lover of macrame during me teen years, and as a lifelong crocheter and knitter, I just could not embrace this design.

Perhaps it was the lack of symmetry and repetition that somehow prevented me from appreciating this 1961 Marie-Françoise Héron design.

But looking at it through a different lens, the lens of possibilities, I can finally see and appreciate the beauty of Madame Héron’s timpanist.

The Le Timbalier Hermès carre is gorgeous whether in bold colors or this season’s soft pastels. The suggested textures add to its versatility and culminate in a fabulous scarf and accessory. One that lends itself to be draped and played with in so many creative ways, each time offering a new fresh look.

LE TIMBALIER HERMES SCARF BY MARIE-FRANCOISE HERON 90 CM SILK NIB – AVAILABLE

Well Hermès decided to re-issue it this season in various colorways and at $470 it has been flying off the shelves and is currently only available in selected boutiques and no longer online.

LE TIMBALIER HERMES SCARF BY MARIE-FRANCOISE HERON 90 CM SILK NIB – AVAILABLE

But do not despair! You can find a 1990s issue in pristine unworn condition at our eBoutique, Carre de Paris © .

Here is what Hermès© has to say about the Inspiration for this truly iconic Hermès Classic:

Until the end of the Second Empire, the role of the timpanist was to provide the drum beat for French cavalry regiments. The drummer in full dress featured in the center of this scarf, designed in 1961 by Marie-Françoise Héron, plays his instrument with panache. The royal coat of arms with two interlaced L’s seen on his drum evokes the 18th century. The horse, too, is exuberantly dressed. The ceremonial saddle and bridle, like the surround, are ornamented with sumptuous decorative trimmings: lanyards, braids, fringes and twisted cords, not forgetting cartisanes – wooden discs adorned with silver, gold or silk threads.

© Hermès 2022. All rights reserved

LE TIMBALIER HERMES SCARF BY MARIE-FRANCOISE HERON 90 CM SILK NIB – AVAILABLE

Hommage a l’Explorateur Sir Ernest Shackleton

Here for now are some photos of the one and only Hommage a l’Explorateur Sir Ernest Shackleton by Zoe Pauwels, a Special Edition/Issue scarf from 2005.

More about this truly special and considered by many a GRAIL Hermès carré a little later. But in the meantime here are some photos for your enjoyment…

British Heraldry Hermes Carre by Rybal

The British Heraldry Hermes scarf was issued in 1981 making it one of four up to that time designs, that pay homage to the British Crown.

Hermes Silk Scarf Queens Jubilee

The first, Queen, was issued to honor the Queen’s first visit to France in 1961 and was re-issued in 1977 as a special issue for the Royal Jubilee, and renamed to Dieu et Mon Droit (God and my Right) Queen’s Silver Jubilee 1977.

Regina Hermes Silk Scarf-9

Regina by Leila Menchari was conceived for Queen Elizabeth’s second visit in 1972.

The British Heraldry, however, is in honor of the Prince of Wales bearing his coat of arms against the backdrop of stunning Gothic architecture.

British Heraldry Hermes Silk Scarf

The British Heraldry was designed by Vladimir Rybaltchenko, AKA Rybal, and was first issued in 1981 and was according to Hermès, “intended to commemorate the Crown Prince’s marriage while calling on the continuity of history.”

Vladimir Rybaltchenko an accomplished artist, pictured here from the 1991 issue of Le Monde d’Hermès

Rybal

Vladimir Rybaltchenko (1939 – 2002) was the great-nephew of Philippe Ledoux and father of Dimitri Rybaltchenko, all renowned Hermès artists.

The Inspiration for the LE JARDIN DE LA MAHARANI

Leave it to Annie Faivre to create another wonderfully intricate and a perfect scarf for summer, her Le Jardin de la Maharani. Dedicated to a princess, this scarf will make anyone who wears it feel like one…

LE JARDIN DE LA MAHARANI HERMES SCARF BY ANNIE FAIVRE 90 CM SILK NIB – AVAILABLE
LE JARDIN DE LA MAHARANI HERMES SCARF BY ANNIE FAIVRE 90 CM SILK NIB – SOLD

GRANDE TENUE HERMES SCARF BY HENRI D’ORIGNY

The Grande Tenue, In Full Dress, as it were, does not refer to a stylish blazer and a pleaded skirt, but rather the broadcloth covers or stable blankets, here neatly held together by leather straps and decorated with emblems and monograms identifying the owners and their stables. Thanks to Émile Hermès, the Parisian Fashion House, boasts quite a large collection of these emblems. Several of which are represented on this iconic Hermès design from 1985 by Henri d’Origny (re-issued due to its popularity numerous times).

Grande Tenue Hermes scarf was designed by Henri d’Origny in 1985 and reissued numerous times since

Napoleon III is represented opposite a lion emerging from a crown in the upper right corner. Other emblems are of a Romanian prince, a maharaja as well as one of a viscount, represented by a more graphic design on the upper left broadcloth.

At the center of course the monogram of the curator and collector himself, Émile Hermès, whose passion for collecting has inspired numerous scarf designs, among them for example, the Ecuries, Presentation de Chevaux and the Carrick a Pompe (links are provided for further reading).

The Grande Tenue makes up for what it lacks in rarity meter by its popularity. This is a design available in a wide range of colorways ranging from bold and vibrant to classic and elegant. Hence making it one of the most loved and recognized of Hermes designs.

Grande Tenue Hermes Carre – SOLD

CHATEAUX D’ARRIERE Hermès carre

The title of the CHATEAUX D’ARRIERE carre that Julia Abadie designed for Hermès in 1974 can be at first glance confusing.

Why?

There are ships but no “châteaux” featured in this bold design.

That is because in French château(x) d’arrière means sterncastle(s), which is also known as after- or aftcastle, typically a quite ornate rear portion of a sailing ship. This part of the ship houses the captains cabin and possibly those of other high ranking officers.
Le Soleil Royal (Château arrière) 17th century flagship of the French Royal Fleet (photo courtesy http://theudericus.free.fr/)

Madame Abadie is not the only Hermès artist to feature this typically highly ornate part of a sailing ship, the Château Arrière, in her design; others have done as well.

Here are some rather opulent examples – enjoy.

France Hermès carre by Christiane Vauzelles from 1962 – SOLD
The popular and quite stunning Hermes La Reale – Vue du Carrosse de la Galère by Hugo Grygkar was first issued in 1953 – SOLD
Rare Hermes Armada silk scarf by Christiane Vauzelles from 1976 – SOLD
The La Marine a Rames Hermes scarf was started by Philippe Ledoux and finished after his death in 1975 by his nephew Vladimir Rybaltchenko – SOLD
Marie-Françoise Héron designed the Grande Marine in 1979 – SOLD

La France HERMES Carre by Francoise de la Perriere 1959

Even before I could read, maps captured my imagination. Neither the heaviness nor its size ever stopped me from pulling the oversized atlas from among the smaller books until I managed to place it safely on the rug in front of me. Its pages provided endless opportunities for incredible journeys at first following such guides as Robin Crusoe and later Jacque Cousteau.

So it is no wonder that even today I am immediately drawn to designs like the La Cite Cavaliere or the La France.

La Cite Cavaliere Hermes Scarf Designed by Octave Marsal 2019/2020 – Personal Collection

Sixty years its senior, to me the de la Perriere creation is as captivating as the Marsal.

La France Hermes carre – AVAILABLE

In her 1959 design, Françoise de la Perriere highlights the various regions of France and represents them skillfully and beautifully with symbols for each area. There is so much to behold here; from the Monche (The Channel) in the north to the Mediterranean in the south, from the Atlantic in the west to the Vosges in the East…

But lets begin with the rooster at the center, the Coq Gaulois, the longtime unofficial symbol of France. From here we can travel to Notre Dame, then Mont Sainct Michele and end at Château of Chambord.

The fairylike Château of Chambord in the Loire Valley (photo courtesy Wikipedia
Mont-Saint-Michel (Photo courtese Amaustan – Own work, CC BY-SA 4.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=79528206)

Madame de la Perrier did not forget France’s mountain regions with the Pyrenees bordering Spain, the Alps Italy and Switzerland, and the Vosges Germany.

France’s famous wine regions are also all represented here; Bordeaux, Champagne, Loire Valley, Burgundy, Beaujolais, Alsace (Rhine) and Rhone. We are also reminded of France’s long tradition with horses and horseback riding with the cowboy from the Camargue region in the South, polo gear representing Chantilly and a jockey competing at a race at Ateuil.

Nature’s bounty and epicurean cuisine are of course also included as are other iconic architectural works. Altogether they showcase France’s riches and together they allow us to travel from destination to destination, pausing here and there, enjoying and discovering the wonder of Madame de la Perriere’s creation.

I will dare to suggest that the fashion House itself is represented here in the form of a carriage
Bravo Madame de la Perrière et merci beaucoup!
LA FRANCE HERMES CARRE BY FRANCOISE DE LA PERRIERE 1959 – SOLD

CErès HermÈs CarrÉ by Francoise faconnet

Ceres Hermes scarf by the fabulously talented Francoise Faconnet doesn’t have anything to do with the dwarf planet nor the city in central California as you might already suspect.

Ceres Hermes scarf designed by Françoise Faconnet in 1967 – here an original issue

The Hermes Ceres is depicting the Roman Goddess by the same name. Ceres was the goddess of agriculture, fertility, grains, harvest, motherhood, and the earth and the Roman counterpart to the Greek Goddess Demeter. She is believed to have ended the unsettled wandering and lawless lifestyle of our predecessors and was credited to have given mankind agriculture and a new, civilized, way of living. The Romans celebrated and made sacrifices to Ceres throughout the year, from ploughing fields, to planting seeds up to harvest time.

The biggest festival in her honor, the Cerealia, was held from mid to late April and lasted several days. It took place at Circus Maximus, the large Roman stadium typically reserved for chariot racing. This annual festival involved some unusual pagan rituals like foxes running with lit torches tied to their tails or one that represented Ceres’ lost daughter Proserpina symbolized by a maiden running around dressed in white. Loving foxes since I was a little girl, I definitely prefer Lawrence Alma-Tadema’s version below.

Spring (1894) by Lawrence Alma-Tadema, depicting the Cerealia in a Roman street (courtesy J. Paul Getty Museum)

Francoise Faconnet’s placed her grain goddess at the center of her design and surrounded her with life’s overflowing bounty and beauty.

The grain goddess Ceres is at the center of this late 1960s design
CERES HERMES SCARF BY FRANCOISE FACONNET 90 CM SILK TWILL ORIGINAL ISSUE – Available $299

Folklore Hermes Carre by henri d’Origny

The Folklore Hermès carre was designed by accomplished artist and Hermès Artistic Director Henri d’Origny, who has a number of designs to his name including ties, jewelry and of course many famous carres.

His Eperon d’Or is a sure Must-Have – SOLD

Many of his designs are inspired by the Fashion House’s love affair with saddlery and equestrian paraphernalia, but not his Folklore scarf. Instead of bits and stirrups, we find birds and flowers. Well, I stand corrected, Monsieur d’Origny does manage to squeeze a reference to equestrianism into each corner of his Folklore design.


But what did inspire this design? I cannot help but be reminded of my grandmother’s “Zwiebelmuster” or “cibulak” drawings; watching her quietly sitting at her large wooden kitchen table, following each of her lines with my imaginary paintbrush.

The popular “Blue Onion’ pattern on Meissen Porcelain has been in production since the 18th century
(photo courtesy Kaolin, Public domain, via Wikimedia Commons)

According to Hermès, Henri d’Origny drew his inspiration on

“…popular Russian and Polish imagery, mixed freely with motifs from his own imagination, Henri d’Origny’s design is an appeal to the Slavic soul, while at the same time expressing his own deep attachment to the equestrian arts. Flowers and stylized birds, bright colors and branching forms are framed with harness straps and braid work in this joyous, multicolored design.”

courtesy © Hermès

Folklore Hermès silk scarf by Henri d’Origny (1980 – 1st issue) – Rare – SOLD