Bon Voyage – Off to Paris and beyond

Off to Paris and Europe on a buying trip. Follow me here or on Instagram for latest News, Photos and more…

The Enchanted world of VALÉRIE Dawlat Dumoulin after HERMÈS

Since I wrote a short biography about Valérie Dawlat Dumoulin in my post in May of 2018, I have had the distinct pleasure to make her acquaintance!

As a longtime fan, you can only imagine my delight and how honored I felt having received an email from her! And with that a wonderful relationship began. 

Valerie Dawlat

In her own words …

« When I discovered Carrés de Paris on the Internet, I was so surprised and delighted to read the chapter on my work as a carré artist, that I decided to come in contact with the founder of this lovely and well documented website.

That is how our relationship came to life, with a mutual understanding and taste for the same HERMÈS vintage carrés.

Unfortunately, at the dramatic departure of Jean-Louis Dumas, Hermès emblematic and charismatic CEO, my ten years collaboration was soon over.

I explain to Carrés de Paris, that I was still creating but in a different way : I am, since almost two years, inventing and manufacturing custom jewellery and Carrés de Paris loved them so much that a decision was taken to give them exposure on their website. 

I proposed to associate visually my vintage carrés designs that are for sale at Carrés de Paris to one of my  jewels, and voilà, « just like that », that is how it is all started, how exciting !!! »

Valérie Dawlat Dumoulin 

Here is an introduction to the enchanted world of Madame Valérie … enjoy

IMPOSE TA CHANCE HERMES SCARF BY VALERIE DAWLAT-DUMOULIN 90 CM SILK & BEEARUM BROOCH AVAILABLE
Impose ta Chance Hermès carré by Valérie Dawlat-Dumoulin avec Beearum Brooch
AVAILABLE
NOUVELLE CALEDONIE HERMES SCARF BY VALERIE DAWLAT-DUMOULIN 90 CM SILK & PAPILLON PAON BROOCH – AVAILABLE
Nouvelle Caledonie Hermès carré by Valérie Dawlat-Dumoulin avec Papillon Paon Brooch – AVAILABLE
ROCCAILE SPECIAL ISSUE HERMES SCARF BY VALERIE DAWLAT-DUMOULIN & PIC EPEICHE BROOCH – AVAILABLE
Roccaile Special Issue Hermès carré by Valérie Dawlat-Dumoulin avec Pic Epeiche Brooch
AVAILABLE
JARDIN CREOLE HERMES SCARF BY VALERIE DAWLAT-DUMOULIN 90 CM SILK & DEMOISELLE KAKI BROOCH – AVAILABLE
Jardin Creole Hermès carré by Valérie Dawlat-Dumoulin avec Demoiselle Kaki Brooch – AVAILABLE

Always an artist, Valérie has created numerous collages and paintings, but more recently discovered a new passion in creating custom jewelry. At first she salvaged and repurposed all of her own jewelry, and as popularity of her one-of-a-kind jewelry grew in her native France, she began to search for unique vintage bits and pieces at flea markets and thrift shops. Self-taught and with an exquisite eye for both beauty and design, she as with her Hermès scarf designs drew her inspiration from flowers, insects, eternal symbols like hearts and crosses, the sea and marine life. She skillfully combines unexpected items with copper wire and magically gives new life to butterflies, flowers and dragonflies!

Merci Mme Valérie de continuer à enrichir notre monde avec de nouvelles créations et une beauté époustouflante.
Ladi

L’Arriere-Main Hermes carre

L’Arriere-Main Hermès carré by Philippe Ledoux 1969 – RARE – Personal Collection

The lovely L’Arriere-Main Philippe Ledoux carré draws its inspiration from a painting by Théodore Géricault entitled Les Croupes, (The Hindquarters/Buttocks).

Théodore Géricault was a French Romantic Painter (1791-1824) from Rouen, France. His oil painting entitled Les Croupes, (The Hindquarters/Buttocks) provided the Inspiration for the 1969 Hermès carré, L’Arriere-Main by Philippe Ledoux

Most likely the studies for this painting found their inspiration at the Royal Stable, the Grande Écurie of Versailles, an impressive structure that could accommodate up to six hundred horses. Constructed during the 17th century under the watchful eye of Jules Hardouin-Mansart, the Royal Stables have been home to the Equestrian Arts Academy (Académie du spectacle équestre) since 2003.

The Great Stables or Royal Stable, the Grande Écurie, at the Palace of Versailles
Les Croupes – close up

Les Croupes, which portrays twenty-four horses from behind is rather an unusual compositions as it features the hindquarters and not the heads of twenty-four horses in three neat rows. Surprisingly there is one defiant horse that stands out as it is turned around facing us, the audience. I cannot help but attribute lightness and humor to this rather unusual arrangement and composition.

Perhaps charmed by this as well was what inspired Philippe Ledoux to reproduce the Les Coupes as a drawing for his 1969, L’Arriere-Main, now highly sought-after design.

L’ARRIERE-MAIN HERMÈS SILK SCARF VINTAGE LEDOUX 1969 – AVAILABLE

Surprisingly Monsieur Ledoux omits the rebellious horse in his drawing but includes the same checkered blankets that are very often found in Géricault’s other paintings. Perhaps it will remain a mystery why Ledoux left the defiant horse out, but included the horse blankets, which undoubtedly link his design to the French master’s. With this the L’Arriere-Main Hermès carré features three rows but only twenty-three hindquarters and not the twenty-four from its original Inspiration.

L’ARRIERE-MAIN HERMES SCARF BY PHILIPPE LEDOUX 90 CM SILK TWILL 1969 – RARE – AVAILABLE

LE TIMBALIER HERMES SCARF BY MARIE-FRANCOISE HERON

We have all seen the timpanist, some of use “love” this design, some of us are indifferent and the rest … well …

I used to belong to the “rest … well” group. Even as a lover of macrame during me teen years, and as a lifelong crocheter and knitter, I just could not embrace this design.

Perhaps it was the lack of symmetry and repetition that somehow prevented me from appreciating this 1961 Marie-Françoise Héron design.

But looking at it through a different lens, the lens of possibilities, I can finally see and appreciate the beauty of Madame Héron’s timpanist.

The Le Timbalier Hermès carre is gorgeous whether in bold colors or this season’s soft pastels. The suggested textures add to its versatility and culminate in a fabulous scarf and accessory. One that lends itself to be draped and played with in so many creative ways, each time offering a new fresh look.

LE TIMBALIER HERMES SCARF BY MARIE-FRANCOISE HERON 90 CM SILK NIB – AVAILABLE

Well Hermès decided to re-issue it this season in various colorways and at $470 it has been flying off the shelves and is currently only available in selected boutiques and no longer online.

LE TIMBALIER HERMES SCARF BY MARIE-FRANCOISE HERON 90 CM SILK NIB – AVAILABLE

But do not despair! You can find a 1990s issue in pristine unworn condition at our eBoutique, Carre de Paris © .

Here is what Hermès© has to say about the Inspiration for this truly iconic Hermès Classic:

Until the end of the Second Empire, the role of the timpanist was to provide the drum beat for French cavalry regiments. The drummer in full dress featured in the center of this scarf, designed in 1961 by Marie-Françoise Héron, plays his instrument with panache. The royal coat of arms with two interlaced L’s seen on his drum evokes the 18th century. The horse, too, is exuberantly dressed. The ceremonial saddle and bridle, like the surround, are ornamented with sumptuous decorative trimmings: lanyards, braids, fringes and twisted cords, not forgetting cartisanes – wooden discs adorned with silver, gold or silk threads.

© Hermès 2022. All rights reserved

LE TIMBALIER HERMES SCARF BY MARIE-FRANCOISE HERON 90 CM SILK NIB – AVAILABLE

Hommage a l’Explorateur Sir Ernest Shackleton

Here for now are some photos of the one and only Hommage a l’Explorateur Sir Ernest Shackleton by Zoe Pauwels, a Special Edition/Issue scarf from 2005.

More about this truly special and considered by many a GRAIL Hermès carré a little later. But in the meantime here are some photos for your enjoyment…

Hermes Scarf Republique Francaise Liberte Egalite Fraternite – 1789

On my last visit to Paris, I could not help but be reminded of my favorite, subject, the Hermès scarf, wherever I went.

I saw inspiration, just like the artists themselves must have, around every corner in this enchanted city.  My favorite and very first scarf, Le Bois de Boulogne, is named after the biggest park, the Bois de Boulogne (I just learned thanks to WIKI, the second largest park), which is 2 and a half times the size of New York’s Central Park.

Another gorgeous vintage Hermès scarf is the Quai aux Fleur, which I had already written about during my stay in Paris.

Today I would like to focus on the Republique Française Liberté Égalité Fraternité – 1789, which was designed for the 200 year anniversary of the French republic.  In his design, Joachim Metz, celebrates France becoming a Republic and perhaps it was not Paris that was his inspiration, however, I found many references here.

The French revolution, which began in 1789, paved the way for France to become a republic in 1792 and Liberté, Egalité, Fraternité French for “Freedom, Equality, Brotherhood”, became the national motto. I, of course, must also mention Marianne, whom Metz so beautifully portrayed on this scarf. Marienne is France’s national emblem.  She represents liberty and is an icon for freedom and democracy.

I found Marianne in many places in Paris.  On government buildings, statues and many other landmarks.  Marianne is one of the most prominent symbols of the French Republic, and is officially used on most government documents.

Marianne is a significant French republican symbol.  She is Republique Française, she is Liberté, Égalité, Fraternité.

This dramatic scarf was first issued in 1989 at the 200 year anniversary of France as a republic and to my knowledge, it has never been re-issued.

P1170872 P1170876

Republique Francaise Liberte Egalite Fraternite – 1789 Hermes Silk Scarf 
Designed by Joachim Metz in 1989  

Les Tuileries by Joachim Metz for the Maison Hermes

Here is one of my all time favorite Hermes scarves, Les Tuileries by Joachim Metz, named after the famous Parisian Gardens leading up to the Louvre.

Last time I was in Paris, a couple of summers ago, I fell in love not just with Paris all over again, but with this stunning part of heaven.  No wonder Mr. Metz used the elaborate entry to the gardens as inspiration for his stunning scarf.

Now available at Carredeparis.com

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Les Tuileries HERMES Scarf

Les Tuileries HERMES Scarf

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Les Tuileries HERMES Scarf

Authentic Vintage Hermes Silk Scarf Concerto by Clerc w/Box and Bolduc Ribbon and more…

Now available at our store

Shop our latest Arrivals by clicking on photos

Concerto Jean Louis Clerc HERMES Paris Silk Scarf Carre de Paris

Concerto Jean Louis Clerc HERMES Paris Silk Scarf Carre de Paris

 

Frontaux et Cocardes HERMES Carre

Frontaux et Cocardes HERMES Silk Scarf by Carre de Paris

Chiens et Valets Rare HERMES Scarf

Chiens et Valets HERMES by Carre de Paris

Cliquetis, Julia Abadie, 1972 first Issue

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Cliquetis HERMES (re-issue) – SOLD

Cliquetis HERMES

Cliquetis HERMES (Original issue) – SOLD

Cliquetis is another HERMES carre that has become an icon in its own right.  Sadly, along with that, it has also become probably one of the most copied designs of the Parisian Fashion House.  Just a cautionary note, if you have just recently fallen in love with the Hermes Carre, please be careful not to purchase any Cliquetis, that sports the Hermes name in bold letters across the entire scarf.  A sure sign that you are dealing with a FAKE!

Cliquetis Hermes Paris

Authentic Cliquetis Hermes Paris

FAKE Cliquetis

FAKE courtesy of Etsy julianata*

*Thankfully, the seller did advertise it as a fake, but sadly someone actually purchased it… 🙂

Back to the inspiration behind Cliquetis.  Cliquetis translates to clatter more or less.

Looking at the scarf, I can almost hear the clatter these swords and sabers might make strung together the way Madame Abadie did on her carre.  The difference between a saber and a sword you ask?

At least the way I understand it is that a sword is a very old weapon dating back to sometime BC, it is straight and designed to thrust.  A saber, on the other hand, is a much more modern invention, think 18th century France.  It is typically curved, sports a larger handguard and its curved blade was designed to primarily slice.

The saber became extremely important during Napoleon’s Empire and almost every soldier had one.  The saber played a huge role in many of his battles including Waterloo.

It was during Napoleon, that officers began to personalize their sabers and swords and thus making the task of identifying them with a specific regiment or army corps much more difficult.  Consequently, large numbers of non-regulatory models exist from that period.  In general, however, the saber was considered par excellence the weapon of chivalry, while the sword was reserved for general officers and, in particular under the Consulate and the Empire, represented more than anything a symbol of civil and military authority.

Julia’s carre represents only some of these models, but certainly enough to give us an idea of the variety of types that were in circulation at the time of the Empire. Two of the most common sabers are located in the bottom row; the first left is a Navy sword, hence the anker and the third one would have most likely belonged to a senior officer of the Imperial Guard.  It is the one with the shell hilt.

I would also like to mention the sabretache in the right corner.

Cliquetis Hermes Paris Early Issue

Cliquetis Hermes Paris Early Issue

Yes, the same sabertache we find in Joachim Metz’s Poste et Cavalerie.  To read more about the Poste et Cavalerie and its sabertaches, please follow the link.

Happy reading.

Cliquetis Hermes Paris Vintage Julia Abadie, 1972

Cliquetis Hermes Paris Vintage Julia Abadie, 1972

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Plaques à Sabler, a Grygkar Treasure

Plaques a Sables HERMES RareThe Plaques à Sabler, which was designed by Hugo Grygkar and first issued in 1956, is a very interesting carre.  First off it is monochromatic.  And then what are we really looking at?

Plaques à Sabler, literally translates as “sanding plates”.  But what does that mean?

After a little research, I have learned that these were special metal plates and most likely used in stables to identify stalls reserved for the most senior officers of the cavalry or the army.
These metal plates had cutouts and were fitted with sturdy handles on the sides as can be seen in the scarf below.

Think of them as “negatives” of designs that were to be imprinted on the surface of the sand in the stalls.

After leveling the sand and compacting it, the plate was covered with colored powder in such a way that, once removed, the imprint or embossing would create a colorful decoration.  Apparently different colors could be used to create the effect of a painting and the results were to be quite remarkable.

The plaques in this carre belonged to Joachim Murat, who was King of Naples under Napoleon Bonaparte.
The Plaques à Sabler carre features five such plates with four hunting scenes on each side and a huntsman on his horse in the center. The four stirrups in the corners are from the early nineteenth century.

Like so many objects, that were the inspiration for the early carres, and especially those designed by Monsieur Grygkar, these metal plaques or plates too are part of Émile Hermès’ famous art collection.

This is a very rare Hermes scarf, sought after by collectors and here believed to be the original issue as it lacks copyright and of course Hugo Grygkar never signed any of his carres.  I have seen the issue date being stated as 1948 on other sites and in other resources, but the 1956 has been confirmed by the Maison Hermès.