On a personal note

I have not taken the time to write a new post because quite frankly, these take a good amount of time, research, photos and such, to make them worth your time; time I just have not had.

Why?

For one, my daughter has driven from coast to coast to visit us, her family and her friends. Her limited time here, a prized commodity, has added a delightful “distraction” to my otherwise structured life.

Our recent new found “freedom”, thank you J&J, Moderna and Pfizer, has allowed my family, and I hope yours as well, to get together and enjoy some of the activities we have in the past and missed so terribly over the past year.

View towards Pyramid Peak, near Lake Tahoe, California, late June, 2021

Finally able to enjoy the ole’ cabin this summer, an annual ritual, we have embraced the outdoors, each other in ways that have brought new level of appreciation and a freshness to long standing traditions.

Here is my takeaway: enjoy life! Spend time with the ones you love; NOW

not tomorrow,

because…you just don’t know.

And as much as I LOVE writing about my passion, the Hermes carre, I know I can hit the pause button this summer and confidently and hopefully with new enthusiasm and a fresh approach, resume my writing later. Perhaps from a diffent coast, or even a different continent :]

So, a big and appreciative thank you, to you, my patient reader.

South Fork American River, California 2021

Gibiers Hermes carre by Henri de Linares

The highly sought-after Gibiers Hermès scarf has at times been also called A d’Oiseaux et de Lievres.

Gibiers Hermes carre by Henri de Linares (1966) – here a 1997 re-issue – JUST IN

Whether you prefer the official Gibiers, Game, or the unofficial With Birds and Hares its creator, Henry de Linares, gave us a scarf that despite its subject matter, has become a GRAIL, in other words, a highly coveted design.

Close up of Gibiers Hermes carre by Henri de Linares (1966 – here a 1997/1998 re-issue without the border) – AVAILABLE

Perhaps it is the detail with which the artist captures the bounty after a hunt; or perhaps his skillfully layered composition that creates such a gorgeous and timeless accessory. Born in 1904, Henri de Linares was a prolific French artist, whose primary focus were detailed studies of hunting trophies.

Henri de Linares, French artist and the creator of numerous Hermes scarves (1904-1987)

I have written about the artist and what is probably my personal favorite of his, the Le Retour du Chasseur (or Lapins Morts).

Henri de LINARES (1904-1987) Bécassines (photo courtesy http://www.invaluable.com)

His still life drawings, lifelike (the irony not withstanding), filled with such incredible detail, are reminiscent of paintings of the early 17th century Northern Renaissance artists. But luckily for us, we do not have to spend thousands to have one of those, we have the beautiful Gibiers Hermes carre, which is not just the ideal accessory but can easily double as a gorgeous wall display.

Gibiers Hermes Scarf by Henri de Linares 90cm Silk Twill w/BOX – AVAILABLE
Early Issue Gibiers Hermès carre – SOLD
Early Issue Gibiers Hermès carre – SOLD
Gibiers Hermès carre – SOLD

GRANDE TENUE HERMES SCARF BY HENRI D’ORIGNY

The Grande Tenue, In Full Dress, as it were, does not refer to a stylish blazer and a pleaded skirt, but rather the broadcloth covers or stable blankets, here neatly held together by leather straps and decorated with emblems and monograms identifying the owners and their stables. Thanks to Émile Hermès, the Parisian Fashion House, boasts quite a large collection of these emblems. Several of which are represented on this iconic Hermès design from 1985 by Henri d’Origny (re-issued due to its popularity numerous times).

Grande Tenue Hermes scarf was designed by Henri d’Origny in 1985 and reissued numerous times since

Napoleon III is represented opposite a lion emerging from a crown in the upper right corner. Other emblems are of a Romanian prince, a maharaja as well as one of a viscount, represented by a more graphic design on the upper left broadcloth.

At the center of course the monogram of the curator and collector himself, Émile Hermès, whose passion for collecting has inspired numerous scarf designs, among them for example, the Ecuries, Presentation de Chevaux and the Carrick a Pompe (links are provided for further reading).

The Grande Tenue makes up for what it lacks in rarity meter by its popularity. This is a design available in a wide range of colorways ranging from bold and vibrant to classic and elegant. Hence making it one of the most loved and recognized of Hermes designs.

Grande Tenue Hermes Carre – SOLD

2011 The hermes year of the contemporary Artisan

Every year Hermès choses a theme for the entire year with several carre designs dedicated to that particular theme from each of the two annual collections.

Ten years ago, Hermès celebrated “the Contemporary Artisan”.

Here the opening quote from the LE CARRÉ HERMÈS Spring Summer collection:

THE SILK WORKSHOP
Here everything is freedom. The colour, design, history, craftsman, artist, sun, light, each tells its story, but in the end, as they know, they all tell the same one: That of silk on the loose. Knotted in the hair, wound about the hips, it runs, it flies, it goes where the light is ever more luminous, the air softer, the sea warmer; it advances towards summer.

© Hermès 2011

LE PEGASE D’HERMES HERMES SILK SCARF BY CHRISTIAN RENONCIAT from 2011 Spring-Summer – AVAILABLE

Other designs from that same collection…

CUIRS DU DESERT HERMES SCARF BY FRANCOISE DE LA PERRIERE 2011 – SOLD
GRAND MANEGE HERMES SCARF BY HENRI D’ORIGNY ORIGINALLY ISSUED IN 1990 (REISSUED 2011) – AVAILABLE
HERMES SUMMER SILK SCARF LALBHAI by MICHEL DUCHENE ISSUED IN 1995 (REISSUED 2011) – SOLD
LES VOITURES NOUVELLES HERMES SCARF BY JACQUES EUDEL ISSUED IN 1961 (REISSUED IN 2011) – AVAILABLE
EPERON D’OR HERMES SILK SCARF BY HENRI D’ORIGNY ISSUED IN 1974 (REISSUED 2011 – SOLD
LE PEGASE D’HERMES HERMES SILK SCARF BY CHRISTIAN RENONCIAT 90 CM HIGHLY SOUGHT AFTER
$ 599 – AVAILABLE

CHATEAUX D’ARRIERE Hermès carre

The title of the CHATEAUX D’ARRIERE carre that Julia Abadie designed for Hermès in 1974 can be at first glance confusing.

Why?

There are ships but no “châteaux” featured in this bold design.

That is because in French château(x) d’arrière means sterncastle(s), which is also known as after- or aftcastle, typically a quite ornate rear portion of a sailing ship. This part of the ship houses the captains cabin and possibly those of other high ranking officers.
Le Soleil Royal (Château arrière) 17th century flagship of the French Royal Fleet (photo courtesy http://theudericus.free.fr/)

Madame Abadie is not the only Hermès artist to feature this typically highly ornate part of a sailing ship, the Château Arrière, in her design; others have done as well.

Here are some rather opulent examples – enjoy.

France Hermès carre by Christiane Vauzelles from 1962 – SOLD
The popular and quite stunning Hermes La Reale – Vue du Carrosse de la Galère by Hugo Grygkar was first issued in 1953 – SOLD
Rare Hermes Armada silk scarf by Christiane Vauzelles from 1976 – SOLD
The La Marine a Rames Hermes scarf was started by Philippe Ledoux and finished after his death in 1975 by his nephew Vladimir Rybaltchenko – SOLD
Marie-Françoise Héron designed the Grande Marine in 1979 – SOLD

La France HERMES Carre by Francoise de la Perriere 1959

Even before I could read, maps captured my imagination. Neither the heaviness nor its size ever stopped me from pulling the oversized atlas from among the smaller books until I managed to place it safely on the rug in front of me. Its pages provided endless opportunities for incredible journeys at first following such guides as Robin Crusoe and later Jacque Cousteau.

So it is no wonder that even today I am immediately drawn to designs like the La Cite Cavaliere or the La France.

La Cite Cavaliere Hermes Scarf Designed by Octave Marsal 2019/2020 – Personal Collection

Sixty years its senior, to me the de la Perriere creation is as captivating as the Marsal.

La France Hermes carre – AVAILABLE

In her 1959 design, Françoise de la Perriere highlights the various regions of France and represents them skillfully and beautifully with symbols for each area. There is so much to behold here; from the Monche (The Channel) in the north to the Mediterranean in the south, from the Atlantic in the west to the Vosges in the East…

But lets begin with the rooster at the center, the Coq Gaulois, the longtime unofficial symbol of France. From here we can travel to Notre Dame, then Mont Sainct Michele and end at Château of Chambord.

The fairylike Château of Chambord in the Loire Valley (photo courtesy Wikipedia
Mont-Saint-Michel (Photo courtese Amaustan – Own work, CC BY-SA 4.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=79528206)

Madame de la Perrier did not forget France’s mountain regions with the Pyrenees bordering Spain, the Alps Italy and Switzerland, and the Vosges Germany.

France’s famous wine regions are also all represented here; Bordeaux, Champagne, Loire Valley, Burgundy, Beaujolais, Alsace (Rhine) and Rhone. We are also reminded of France’s long tradition with horses and horseback riding with the cowboy from the Camargue region in the South, polo gear representing Chantilly and a jockey competing at a race at Ateuil.

Nature’s bounty and epicurean cuisine are of course also included as are other iconic architectural works. Altogether they showcase France’s riches and together they allow us to travel from destination to destination, pausing here and there, enjoying and discovering the wonder of Madame de la Perriere’s creation.

I will dare to suggest that the fashion House itself is represented here in the form of a carriage
Bravo Madame de la Perrière et merci beaucoup!
LA FRANCE HERMES CARRE BY FRANCOISE DE LA PERRIERE 1959 – SOLD

CErès HermÈs CarrÉ by Francoise faconnet

Ceres Hermes scarf by the fabulously talented Francoise Faconnet doesn’t have anything to do with the dwarf planet nor the city in central California as you might already suspect.

Ceres Hermes scarf designed by Françoise Faconnet in 1967 – here an original issue

The Hermes Ceres is depicting the Roman Goddess by the same name. Ceres was the goddess of agriculture, fertility, grains, harvest, motherhood, and the earth and the Roman counterpart to the Greek Goddess Demeter. She is believed to have ended the unsettled wandering and lawless lifestyle of our predecessors and was credited to have given mankind agriculture and a new, civilized, way of living. The Romans celebrated and made sacrifices to Ceres throughout the year, from ploughing fields, to planting seeds up to harvest time.

The biggest festival in her honor, the Cerealia, was held from mid to late April and lasted several days. It took place at Circus Maximus, the large Roman stadium typically reserved for chariot racing. This annual festival involved some unusual pagan rituals like foxes running with lit torches tied to their tails or one that represented Ceres’ lost daughter Proserpina symbolized by a maiden running around dressed in white. Loving foxes since I was a little girl, I definitely prefer Lawrence Alma-Tadema’s version below.

Spring (1894) by Lawrence Alma-Tadema, depicting the Cerealia in a Roman street (courtesy J. Paul Getty Museum)

Francoise Faconnet’s placed her grain goddess at the center of her design and surrounded her with life’s overflowing bounty and beauty.

The grain goddess Ceres is at the center of this late 1960s design
CERES HERMES SCARF BY FRANCOISE FACONNET 90 CM SILK TWILL ORIGINAL ISSUE – Available $299

Folklore Hermes Carre by henri d’Origny

The Folklore Hermès carre was designed by accomplished artist and Hermès Artistic Director Henri d’Origny, who has a number of designs to his name including ties, jewelry and of course many famous carres.

His Eperon d’Or is a sure Must-Have – SOLD

Many of his designs are inspired by the Fashion House’s love affair with saddlery and equestrian paraphernalia, but not his Folklore scarf. Instead of bits and stirrups, we find birds and flowers. Well, I stand corrected, Monsieur d’Origny does manage to squeeze a reference to equestrianism into each corner of his Folklore design.


But what did inspire this design? I cannot help but be reminded of my grandmother’s “Zwiebelmuster” or “cibulak” drawings; watching her quietly sitting at her large wooden kitchen table, following each of her lines with my imaginary paintbrush.

The popular “Blue Onion’ pattern on Meissen Porcelain has been in production since the 18th century
(photo courtesy Kaolin, Public domain, via Wikimedia Commons)

According to Hermès, Henri d’Origny drew his inspiration on

“…popular Russian and Polish imagery, mixed freely with motifs from his own imagination, Henri d’Origny’s design is an appeal to the Slavic soul, while at the same time expressing his own deep attachment to the equestrian arts. Flowers and stylized birds, bright colors and branching forms are framed with harness straps and braid work in this joyous, multicolored design.”

courtesy © Hermès

Folklore Hermès silk scarf by Henri d’Origny (1980 – 1st issue) – Rare – SOLD

Special on Scarf Rings

Making room for new inventory and running a SALE through the end on March or until supplies last.

Buy one of our handmade scarf rings and get one FREE of equal or lesser value

Shop Carre de Paris now…

La Comtesse de Segur Hermes carre by Philippe Dumas

Considered rare and highly sought-after, this carre was designed by Philippe Dumas, grandson of the founder, heir and former CEO of Hermès. Like two of his other designs, the La Comtesse de Segur, showcases his unique unmistakable style which you may recognize from his Les Amazones and Le Cirque Molier.

La Comtesse de Ségur Hermes Carre by Philippe Dumas was first issued in 1982 and re-issued in 1996

The La Comtesse de Ségur Hermes carre depicts several vignettes capturing scenes from the beloved children’s stories by the French writer, Sophie Rostopchine, the Countess of Ségur. Born in Saint Petersburg in the late eighteenth century, Sophie’s family left Russia in 1814 and ultimately ended up in Paris.

Even though the Comtesse did not write her first book until the age of fifty-eight, her stories place her as one of the most famous and most beloved writers of French children’s books. She has twenty novels to her name all written between 1857 and 1869 for her nineteen grandchildren. Her books were published as a collection La Bibliothèque rose illustrée, a set of beautifully bound red books and all her stories were written to both educate and entertain at the same time.

La Bibliothèque rose illustrée by La Comtesse de Ségur
photo courtesy expertissim®

Inspired by these popular children’s books and the adventures of their characters, Philippe Dumas beautifully captures the essence of some of these beloved stories in his equally beloved scarf…

Here perhaps Sophie, Camille, Madeleine and their mothers, all characters from Les Petites Filles Modeles (Good Little Girls), are heading for a ride in the country
“Come on, Félicie, don’t be lazy”
Here the eldest child, Félicie of a rich family, the d’Orvillet, is in trouble with her governess (once again); with little lasting effect, as the story goes…

For me it is unthinkable not to fall in love with this scarf each and every time.

Beautifully executed, it is difficult to just quickly glance at it. To not get involved with the various characters and not follow them along on their adventures? Well, for me that is utterly impossible!

La Comtesse de Segur Hermes scarf – Original 1982 Issue
Designed by Philippe Dumas – Now AVAILABLE